Program Mission

Alpha Emergence Behavioral Health’s mission is to prevent and alleviate the harms of sexual abuse by providing services to perpetrators and those at risk to commit an offense and offering education to involved agencies and the public on topics relevant to sexual abuse perpetration and prevention.

Program Descriptions

Residential Program

AEBH’s residential program is the only Minnesota community-based adult sex offender program that is licensed and certified by the Minnesota Department of Corrections. The residential program incorporates a therapeutic community model and utilizes cognitive behavioral interventions and has been treating sexual offending behaviors since 1973. Residents are either placed in the program through the court system or voluntarily attend the program. 

AEBH specializes in providing treatment for sexual behaviors, including sexual offenses. The program serves adult males experiencing various issues with their sexual behavior from compulsive or addictive sexual behavior to criminal or abusive sexual behavior. The program is highly structured, staffed 24 hours a day, and focuses on behavior change through thoroughly examining clients’ problems in context, integrating multiple modalities and evidence-based practices to find unique solutions to meet the individual’s needs.  

The primary objective of the program is reflected in AEBH’s mission which is to is to prevent and alleviate the harms of sexual abuse by providing services to perpetrators and those at risk to commit an offense and offering education to involved agencies and the public on topics relevant to sexual abuse perpetration and prevention.

In addition to improved emotional and mental health, the residential program seeks to improve protective factors, which contribute to reducing the likelihood of a specific behavior recurring or continuing. Protective factors focused on in the program generally falls into three basic areas:

  • Increasing meaningful interpersonal relationships and family interaction, including appropriate sexual behavior and social skills.
  • Increasing appropriate work behavior and responsible self-support skills.
  • Increasing healthy, responsible interactions with the community.
 

We believe that programming should follow the latest research and evolve as we learn more about what works and what doesn’t and we are committed to ongoing improvement as individuals, clinicians, and as an organization.  

We believe change can only happen when clients are listened to, respected, and fully understood. We take the time to thoroughly examine clients’ problems in context, integrating multiple modalities and evidence-based practices to find unique solutions to meet the individual’s needs.

In addition to individual psychotherapy, the program relies heavily on group therapy, and the therapeutic community which provides a microcosm of society. AEBH emphasizes accountability and individual responsibility for behavior and actions. 

Throughout the program residents progressively earn more time in the community while attending intensive therapy, during the final phase of treatment the clients reduce therapy services and begin reintegration. 

The length of time spent in the program is variable, and depends on client characteristics, motivation, and the treatment plan objectives.

Treatment objectives are determined by integrating the client’s goals, the court’s orders, and research supported risk/need areas. 

Further information about AEBH’s residential program can be obtained by contacting the Clinical Director, Brenda Frye, at (612) 872-8218. Inquiries may also be sent to Alpha Emergence Behavioral Health, 2712 Fremont Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55408-1198 or by e-mail to info@alphaemergence.org.

residential Program Descriptions

The 90–120-day residential comprehensive evaluation provides in-depth information about amenability to treatment and the most appropriate level of treatment intensity for a client (e.g., outpatient treatment, residential treatment, prison-based treatment). A comprehensive assessment report describing the client’s sexual behavior, diagnosis, adjustment, functioning, interpersonal strengths and needs, estimated risk to the community, and identification of additional patterns of criminal or problematic behaviors is generated at the end of participation.  Completion of this program is not required for admittance into the other residential program tracks.

Clients involved in the residential evaluation process participate in the therapeutic community and engage in treatment as a resident.  They work on the same assignments and goals and adhere to the same rules and restrictions.  Program participation, behavioral observation, and psychological and psychophysiological testing may all be a part of the assessment and these evaluations are individualized to the clinical questions referral parties hope to have answered.   Additionally, psychiatric consultations, chemical dependency evaluations, and drug screening may be incorporated into the evaluation.

This is AEBH’s principal program. It is designed for clients who need a highly supervised, structured placement for a longer, yet a time limited period. The residential program utilizes the therapeutic community as well as evidence-based treatment framework and methods. These methods include but are not limited to, Risk Needs, and Responsivity, Good Lives Model, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Group Therapy Process.  Phases I-III are designed to be completed in 13 months; however, some clients require longer to complete the goals of the program. Phase IV lasts anywhere from 1-6 months depending on client risk and need. Continuing care is a twice per month outpatient group that occurs once a client has achieved Phase IV or higher and uses group therapy process focused on use of tools with more freedom, working through risks, triggers, and stressors that may arise. Continuing care lasts approximately 6-12 months and clients attend this while in post Phase IV and Post Residential Phase. The overall residential program is comprised of residential, continuing care and post-residential phases. 

Sample goals of the primary phases (I-III) are:

  • Recognize the difference between positive social influences and negative social influences in their lives. Develop emotional intimacy with friends or peers.
  • Develop the tools necessary to establish and maintain a healthy intimate relationship with a partner.
  • Develop insight into and an understanding of the underlying issues that contributing to sexual offending. This may include addressing cognitive distortions, trauma history, hostility toward certain groups of people, empathy deficits, impulsivity issues, problem solving and decision-making deficits.
  • Identify and create a management plan for attraction to or identification with children (if present).
  • Address mental health issues through therapy within the program or outside the program and medication management, if needed. Referrals to specific therapies (i.e., EMDR, DBT, family therapy, couples counseling) may be recommended.
  • Address issues with unhealthy sexual preferences, attractions, urges. (Note: unhealthy is determined based on the positive/negative impact it has on a person’s life – this is not defined by what is conventionally considered healthy or unhealthy).
  • Create a plan for managing arousal and/or sexual preoccupation that includes balanced and respectful sexual interests in age‐appropriate partner(s).
  • Develop coping skills that are adaptive and that don’t rely on using sex to cope with emotions.
  • Create a plan for cooperating with conditions of supervision and responding positively to reasonable guidance and support from others both while in and after treatment.
  • Address needs identified during the assessment and intake process as well as those identified during treatment. Needs may include employment, education, development of pro social behaviors and attitudes, skill development, etc.  This is guided in part by the individual’s STABLE assessment.
  • Develop strong and healthy self-esteem that includes solid self-regulation skills, and pro social values and attitudes.     

 

Sample Goals of the Continuing Care Process include

  • Client engages in an outpatient group with others who have been in residential, may be in post residential or may have been referred from outpatient to practice tools, interpersonal skills and self-management while in a community-based setting.
  • Address any risks, triggers, or stressors that arise while integrating into the community
  • Develop strong connections and support and practice utilizing this in the community with the assistance of a cohesive therapeutic group.
  • Manage emotional distress and other mental health or sexual issues that arise while integrating in the community.
  • Develop a strong prevention care plan that is individualized and meets the needs of the client
  • Continue to stay connected to the residential program through Older Brothers Group and by mentoring brothers that are newer in residence and process this experience in the therapy group

 

Sample Goals of the Post-Residential Phase include:

  • Develop a commitment to and engagement in school, work, and/or organized leisure activity.  
  • Develop a healthy adult social support network comprised of family and friends and decrease connections with negative social influences.
  • Obtain and maintain a stable and secure living arrangement in a pro social and healthy sexual environment.                                                            
  • Implement a healthy lifestyle that includes healthy sexual interests and adherence to laws and expectations of society.
  • Maintain sobriety and abstinence from problematic or abusive sexual behavior.
  • Additionally, the post residential phase allows an opportunity for the client to apply what he has learned in treatment. AEBH monitors the client’s adjustment including maintain employment, internet use, access to sexual materials, probation compliance, mental health, etc. If concerns are observed, there is an opportunity for the client to return to an earlier phase of treatment.

 

New clients begin treatment in the residential program regardless of which track with a one-week orientation.  Orientation includes assignment of a “support brother,” applying for general assistance, participating in an introductory group with the other residents, reading through the client handbook, beginning working on five major historical assignments, and completing psychological testing.

Long Term Residential Program Phase Overview

[Note: 90–120-day program clients work in tandem with these phases but are considered phase 1 for their entire stay in terms of rules and support]

Phase I: (Planning and Orientation) Phase I consists of treatment planning and psychoeducation. During Phase I clients develop their goals for treatment and the plan to accomplish those goals. Additionally, they review the program goals and the goals their treatment provider has developed based on their assessed risk factors and needs, using the RNR model. The client learns about risk factors and collaboratively, with his treatment provider, creates an action plan for change during treatment. Phase I is complete when the client has articulated all treatment goals (personal, program, and risk/need based), demonstrated behaviorally these goals, and developed an actionable, achievable, and time-based plan for addressing those treatment goals.

 

Phase II: (Offense Dynamics and Sexuality) Phase II consists of work on the goals developed in phase I. Phase II and III are where the client spends the bulk of the program and does most of the therapeutic work. Phase II is focused on exploring the dynamics of their offending, sexuality, and how to get their needs met in healthy ways. Some of the specific work in this phase includes the clients exploring their sexual history, and behaviors related to sexual offending, understanding and addressing sexual fantasies, increasing awareness of their high-risk situations and offense cycle and addressing any sexual compulsivity.

 

Phase III (Impact and Introspection): Phase III explores the impact their behavior had on the victims and victim empathy. They also focus on building a good life that address their mental health needs, and underlying issues (addiction, grief, identity issues, trauma, anger, body image, etc.).  During this phase they will also look at their behaviors through a cultural and identity development lens and begin to understand what healthy sexuality looks like.  They will begin to explore the concepts of healthy intimacy and boundaries as well.

 

Phase IV (Community Focus and Healthy Living): Once the client completes Phase III, they begin to focus on the community connections and healthy living plans. In this phase clients are identifying and participating in self-help groups, social networks, dating and relationships. The client’s support system is heavily involved in Phase IV and will be asked to participate in reintegration programming at the facility which may consist of family group sessions, family therapy sessions, or case management sessions. Clients should be working full time and/or be in school full time by the end of phase IV. Clients also engage in the outpatient continuing care group during phase IV and V.  Clients also explore their own values and how to live a life aligned with these values.  At the end of this phase, they complete a transition plan and establish post residential living arrangements, treatment, and support.

 

Phase V (Aftercare and Discharge): After completion of Phase IV the client begins to work toward the discharge process and is engaged in more community-based programming. During Phase V the client works with probation and their community supports to determine ongoing needs in the community and to fulfill any remaining obligations to probation such as polygraph testing, having a chaperone trained, community service, etc. The client should be living independently, attending individual therapy outside of SO work if needed, medication management, mentor others in the residential earlier phases. Clients also should have a clear understanding of their own sexuality, sexual health and barriers that may still exist so that they can address this using the coping they have learned in the earlier phases.  Once the client has approval from their treatment provider and probation, they may be discharged from treatment successfully.

This program is intended to serve clients who have engaged in sexual harm who are in need of a shorter term structured intensive environment for a variety of reasons.  Reasons include but are not limited to:  diversion, probation violation, short term intensively focused treatment needs, or a re-charge.  AEBH’s residential program uses the principles of the therapeutic community as well as evidenced based framework for treatment. Specific and individualized goals are set using the short-term program guide for each client. At discharge, clients are expected to enter an appropriate outpatient treatment program.

This program is designed in part to increase the likelihood of success in an outpatient setting by providing an intensive, highly supervised, yet short-term that may complement treatment they received in corrections, outpatient or other services.  A secondary goal is to shorten the overall time this client needs to successfully complete outpatient treatment.

Psychosexual Evaluations

These evaluations, also known as risk evaluations, consist of one or more interviews with the client. Questionnaires, indexes, and assessments are completed during evaluation, including sexual inventories designed explicitly to assess sexual offenders. Contacts may be made with the client’s family, attorney, investigating office, community service officer, other therapists, and others who may be involved and verify a client’s personal and offense history. These evaluations can be completed at our office or while the offender is in custody.

The above assessments can be enhanced by combining them with psychophysiological assessments such as the polygraph, the plethysmograph, or the LOOK Assessment. 

30, 60, or 90 days residential evaluations

AEBH offers a residential placement for a comprehensive sex offender evaluation.   Clients participate in all programming offered in the residential setting in addition to other testing and assessment as determined by the treatment team. These assessments may include:

  • Personality assessment testing
  • Plethysmograph examination
  • Polygraph
  • Sexual interest testing
 

Residential evaluations can assist the treatment team and referral sources with:

  • Identification of patterns of behavior and related precursors
  • Identification of abusive or problematic sexual behaviors
  • Assessment of sexual compulsivity
  • Identification of interpersonal deficits
  • Assessment of the likelihood of continued risk to the community
  • Determination of the most appropriate treatment setting
  • Identification of additional patterns of criminal or inappropriate behavior

Outpatient services

AEBH strives to provide high quality, tailored services for individuals experiencing problematic sexual behavior. Our commitment to client-centered care is unwavering. We believe our client’s needs are the most important when it comes to preventing sexual abuse and creating safe communities. 

Our philosophy is that real change can only happen when clients are listened to, respected, and fully understood. We take the time to thoroughly examine clients’ problems in context, integrating multiple modalities and evidence-based practices to find unique solutions to meet the individual’s needs.

All treatment at Emergence begins with an intake, otherwise known as a diagnostic assessment. This assessment is where we begin the treatment process and start developing treatment goals in collaboration with the client. The client’s needs are assessed, and plan of action is developed based on the information gathered.

A diagnostic assessment consists of an interview with the client and culminates in a report documenting the client’s functioning and needs. The report includes the client’s current mental health status, history, the nature and severity of mental illness/behavioral difficulties, functional impairment, strengths, and resources.

A diagnostic assessment is necessary to determine a client’s need and eligibility for services. From this assessment we determine program placement.

Outpatient treatment is available for those individuals who do not need treatment in a secured setting nor the level of structure or intensity provided by AEBH’s residential treatment program. The overall goal of this program is to reduce the likelihood or a recurrence of inappropriate or abusive sexual behavior.

Outpatient referrals may come from the courts, probation, social service agencies, health care management organizations, attorneys, employers, families, and clients themselves. Outpatient services range from programming designed for low-risk individuals that meet as little as once a month to higher risk individuals who attend services multiple times a week. 

All programming at AEBH is individualized. Our program is not “cookie cutter” and each client works through treatment programming developed collaboratively with them based on information gathered through clinical interviews, assessments, 3rd party collateral, and sources outside our agency who work with the client and understand their needs.

Payments for outpatient services can be made by the client, medical insurance, available state grants, or by the referring agency. In some cases, a referring agency to pays part of the cost while the individual pays the remainder.

Outpatient Program Descriptions

Intervention program for men who buy sex (aka John School)

Our insight program is an innovative program designed specifically for men who buy sex. Primarily men in this program have solicited a prostitute either on the street or via the internet. Some men in this group have solicited sex in exchange or money from someone who was not a prostitute. The program focuses on the reasons behind men’s decisions to pay for sex. Our aim is not to fixate on guilt and shame, but instead bring men on a journey regarding their association with prostitution through assessment, education, self-awareness, and attitude and behavior change. The program’s goal is for men to gain insight into their actions and evaluate areas of their lives that might benefit from additional therapy exploration. This is a day-long educational and interactive program that takes place in a group or individual setting. This program is not eligible for insurance coverage.

These evaluations, also known as risk evaluations, consist of one or more interviews with the client. Questionnaires, indexes, and assessments are completed during evaluation, including sexual inventories designed explicitly to assess sexual offending behaviors. Contacts may be made with the client’s family, attorney, investigating office, community service officer, other therapists, and others who may be involved and verify a client’s personal and offense history. These evaluations can be completed at our office or while the offender is in custody.

This class is designed to educate friends or family members about proper supervision techniques, roles, responsibilities, and expectations of an approved supervisor. This training takes place in a group setting. Friends or family members interested in this training must have access to and be able to bring with them the statement of probable cause for the person they plan to supervise as well as the probation conditions. Once this training is completed, the supervisor receives a letter stating they participated and completed the training. Approval of the individual to be a supervisor for the client is ultimately up to probation, child protective services, and the treatment provider.

Juvenile sexual offending treatment program

Ignite is an outpatient treatment program designed to treat juveniles between the ages of 13 and 18 who are at risk of committing a harmful sexual act or have committed an illegal sexual offense. The treatment model is non-shaming and designed to empower the juvenile to improve their lives, manage risk for future harmful behaviors, and increase the community’s safety.

Treatment begins with diagnostic assessment and treatment planning. Once assessment is complete, the client is assigned to a clinician who meets with them individually. Frequency of sessions is based on the client need. Family plays an integral role in recovery and is included in the treatment process whenever possible. We also work closely with probation agents to ensure the requirements of probation and the courts are met.

The goal is for the client to emerge as an individual with improved self-image, identify abuse and appropriate boundaries, take responsibility for their behavior, maintain healthy, supportive family and peer relationships, and manage or reject abusive thoughts/fantasies, seeking support when needed.

Treatment is highly individualized, and the length depends on each client’s needs and level of motivation. Most juveniles can complete the program in 12 months.

Transitional aftercare program (TAP)

TAP is a maintenance and continuum of care program for clients released from prison who participated in treatment while in prison or civil commitment. The program is designed to aid in the preparation of a well-organized and healthy transition into the community. TAP is an extension of treatment—our goal is to help clients strengthen and apply the cognitive, behavioral, social, and vocational skills they’ve learned as they transition into society.

Participants have already developed a detailed release plan addressing all aspects of a sober and crime-free lifestyle after release and a re-offense prevention plan. The purpose of TAP is to reinforce these plans and address any difficulties after release. Emphasis is placed on enhancing and expanding opportunities for positive future life choices that would support a healthy lifestyle and reaffirming coping skills and relapse prevention strategies.

This program is provided for as long as the participant’s individual needs indicate it is beneficial to their goals of sobriety and a prosocial lifestyle. Expected attendance is 12 months, or at the discretion of the treatment provider and parole agent. Treatment groups meet twice a month.

Treatment Completion

Our Summit program is designed to assist clients who have previously participated in treatment but have not completed treatment to address their remaining needs. Goals may include finishing treatment work, having a chaperone trained, taking and passing a polygraph, attending support person sessions, completing arousal/interest assessments, and/or referrals to supplementary groups (such as SAA, AA, NA or MH therapy) to address the remaining needs.

Intensive Outpatient Program

Intensive Outpatient programming is considered to be an acute, shorter-term process, addressing specific mental health and behavioral needs.  AEBH Intensive Outpatient Program is a specialized program focused on the needs of clients who have committed sexual harm and are suffering from underlying psychological issues, history of trauma, substance use problems and/or other neurodevelopmental issues.  Problems in these domains have likely escalated to the point where an increased level of intensity for treatment will be beneficial. 

Participants will engage in daily treatment activities provided by a multidisciplinary team. The specific schedule is dependent on individual treatment needs.  Treatment programming takes place from 9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday with 15 hours of intensive clinical services offered weekly along with adjunct services, engagement in the therapeutic milieu and study halls for structured time to work on therapeutic assignments with peers and clinical staff. 

Taking responsibility for sexually abusive behavior is an important part of treatment. This program is designed for clients who do not need in-depth sexual offending treatment, but who do need more information and education about sexuality, appropriate boundaries, and responsible sexual behavior.

The Psychoeducational Course addresses the issues of inappropriate sexual behavior and sexual harassment. It introduces topics that are addressed in traditional treatment by means of an educational format. This approach provides an alternative method for addressing allegations of inappropriate sexual conduct when there is an insufficient level of responsibility accepted by the client for placement in a traditional therapy group or when placement in such a group is not warranted. Participants are not required to disclose to the group the nature or reason for their referral to the course. Discussions are, instead, focused on the topics presented by the facilitators. Class members are then required to demonstrate proficiency in the course material through written tests corresponding to the presented topics.

The goals of this course are to provide an opportunity for participants to explore the nature of defense mechanisms, to support the decision to become more candid regarding their behavior, and to encourage the exploration of issues surrounding their problematic sexual behaviors. Additionally, the objectives are to provide participants with information about sexual functioning, to alter attitudes, to reduce shame, and to improve the problem-solving and stress management abilities of those in the course. Often, participation in the course results in a class member developing increased motivation for entering into a traditional therapy group. For others, it provides useful information to guide future behavioral choices.

The psychoeducational course uses lectures, guest presentations, movies, group discussions, in-group assignments, homework assignments, and post-tests of each content area covered. The post-tests are administered after each topic and must be passed at the 80% level. If participants do not reach this level, they must do remedial work until they are able to answer at least 80% of the questions correctly, ensuring that the material is mastered at a significant level. While this course is not a substitute for treatment, it can be an appropriate adjunctive service. It should be noted that completion of the Psychoeducational Program is not the equivalent of completing a treatment program.

The following topics are covered in the psychoeducational program: reproductive anatomy, sexually transmitted infections, birth control, sexuality throughout the lifespan, masturbation, sexual fantasy and pornography, healthy and unhealthy sexuality, intimacy, touch and boundary issues, shame and guilt, stress management, chemical abuse, defense mechanisms, denial and offending, sexually abusive behaviors, types of sexual offending, victim impact, reoffense prevention.

Customized psychoeducational courses are available as well. The curriculum can be modified to meet the specific needs of a particular referred client. All the topics noted above are available for a customized psychoeducational course and the referring agency, in collaboration with the course facilitators, can determine which topics are relevant to that client.

Workshops are not billable to insurance, these are educational programs designed to improve functioning and provide support.

This full-day workshop utilizes the documentary Brain, Heart, World to discuss pornography and its effects. As a group, the documentary is viewed in sections and discussed thoroughly through group process and individual worksheets.  This program explores the scientific research of the physiological and neurological harm pornography has on individuals as well as pornography’s impacts on romantic relationships and platonic relationships including everyday interpersonal connections. Time is also spent learning about pornography’s impact on society in various ways including the link to sex trafficking.

Workshops are not billable to insurance, these are educational programs designed to improve functioning and provide support.

The 40-day reset workshop is designed to be a continuation of the 3 day workshop. This group will meet once weekly for an 8 week period and will have daily tasks to complete.

Pornography addiction is a real health issue experienced by more than 200,000 Americans. Although the topic may make some people uncomfortable, it is a critical issue to address. Pornography is often used as a distraction to avoid dealing with difficult emotions and to escape into fantasies. Our therapists explore these underlying issues with the client and help them healthily re-engage in reality.

Therapy for porn addiction targets the issues of denial, shame, loneliness, intimacy problems, and anxiety that can accompany and contribute to an addiction to porn. We believe that providing our clients with unconditional positive regard is especially important in the recovery process. Treatment utilizes research-based practices to increase clients’ awareness of their maladaptive thoughts and understand how their behaviors prevent them from living a full life with healthy relationships, intimacy, and sex.

The client decides the ultimate goal of porn addiction therapy with the help of their therapist. It may be a reduction in their pornography consumption and minimize the negative impact it has on their lives, and for others, it may be to stop watching pornography entirely.

It is encouraged that this workshop be supplemented by joining other support groups and increasing healthy lifestyle activities to enhance therapy’s effectiveness and decrease the chances of relapse.

Sexual offending treatment program

Our Journey program is an outpatient program that provides holistic, effective treatment to adults at risk to commit a harmful sexual act or who have committed an illegal sexual offense. Our whole-person treatment model empowers clients to improve their lives, manage risk for future harmful behaviors, and increase the community’s safety. The program—comprised of education and therapy using a group process—covers several topics related to personal and sexual history, patterns of abusive behaviors, relationships, communication, impact of harmful behavior, management of emotions, healthy sexuality, and developing a re-offense prevention plan.

Treatment begins with a diagnostic assessment and treatment planning. We develop a personalized treatment plan and assign clients to a treatment group (if appropriate). The program consists of three phases:

  • After diagnostic assessment, the client enters Phase I, where they learn how to do group therapy, begin to explore factors that may have contributed to their behaviors, and develop a plan for their treatment. If the client has prior treatment experience, they move directly to phase II and do not participate in phase I.
  • The client then moves to Phase II, where they explore in-depth their treatment plan goals which are developed with their risk factors, needs, strengths, and personal goals in mind. 
  • Finally, they move to Phase III (aftercare), where they step down to a lower level of care and begin the transition out of treatment.


Treatment typically consists of weekly group therapy and monthly individual and or family therapy. Whenever possible, we include families in the treatment process to optimize recovery. The length of treatment depends on each client’s risk/needs and level of motivation.

Healthy sexuality and boundaries

This therapy is designed to provide education, guidance, and personalized treatment for clients who exhibit problematic sexual behaviors but have not been referred for a full treatment program. This program is focused on healthy sexuality and boundaries and is a 16-week group. Group members meet weekly for both group and individual sessions. The pace of the program is quick so clients must be motivated to attend consistently, stay on task, and move along together.

Therapy for sexual addiction (sometimes called compulsive sexual behavior) targets the issues of denial, shame, loneliness, intimacy problems, and anxiety that can accompany and contribute to problematic sexual behaviors. We believe that providing our clients with unconditional positive regard is especially important in the recovery process. Treatment utilizes research-based practices to increase clients’ awareness of their maladaptive thoughts and understand how their behaviors prevent them from living a full life with healthy relationships, intimacy, and sex.

The goal of sexual addiction therapy is decided by the client with the help of their therapist. For some, it may be a reduction in their pornography consumption and minimizing the negative impact it has on their lives, for others it may be to stop watching pornography entirely, for yet others it may be to reduce or discontinue a specific sexual behavior. Treatment may also be supplemented by joining additional support groups and increasing healthy lifestyle activities to enhance the effectiveness of therapy and decrease the chances of relapse.

Emerging adult sexual offending treatment program

Our Emerge program is an outpatient program that provides holistic, effective treatment to emerging adults between the ages of 18 and 23 who are at risk to commit a harmful sexual act or who have committed an illegal sexual offense. The program is designed to meet the unique needs of persons who are transitioning from adolescence to adulthood. The treatment program takes a positive and non-adversarial approach, utilizes a developmental approach to help the individual successfully benefit from the maturation process that will help maximize their potential leading to a healthy sexual future free from harm.

Treatment begins with a diagnostic assessment and treatment planning. We develop a personalized treatment plan and assign clients to a treatment group (if appropriate). Treatment is highly individualized and typically consists of twice per month individual sessions in conjunction with once per month group therapy. Whenever possible, we include families in the treatment process to optimize recovery. The length of treatment depends on each client’s needs and level of motivation therefore, length of time the in the program varies for each client. Clients can expect to be in treatment an average of 12-18 months.

The goals of the treatment program are individualized to address the specific risk and needs of each client. The program is comprised of education and therapy using a group process. It covers several areas including offense dynamics, personal history, sexual education, consent, sexual beliefs and attitudes, re-offense prevention, values, self-regulation, problem solving, relationships, self-esteem and healthy lifestyle.

Intensive treatment program

Understanding that not all clients have the same level of risk, this program is designed to work with clients determined to have moderate to high needs. This programming is an intensive program designed to meet the needs of clients with antisocial backgrounds, treatment-resistant history, moderate-high criminogenic needs, or moderate-high stable dynamic risk factors.

Clients with moderate-high risk/needs (as rated by the STABLE-2007) have different treatment needs and are less likely to succeed in typical outpatient programming. These clients require more intensive interventions initially to address behavior patterns and reintegration needs.

The program addresses stable dynamic risk factors related to sexual offending, reintegration challenges and criminogenic needs. If these areas are addressed, it can substantially reduce the likelihood of sexually abusive behavior, instability in the community, and continued criminal behavior engagement. The program’s goal is to effectively address specific risk and needs of the clients with a goal of improved functioning and reduced criminal or abusive behaviors in the community.

Clients engage in a weekly core group that meets for 3 hours to discuss risk management. Once appropriate, clients transition from the weekly core group to an every other week Transition group until they are suitable for discharge.

Individual therapy

Our Voyage program is a one-on-one program that is individualized to each client’s specific needs. Some clients engage in this treatment as part of a treatment mandate, while others seek this therapy voluntarily to achieve self-improvement. This program is highly individualized, and a treatment plan is developed to address specific issues that can range from several types of sexual behaviors.

The Supervision/Support group addresses issues regarding reintegration into the community, such as, employment, housing, access to community resources, family reunification, and adjustment to intensive supervised release. Clients attend this post-release programming weekly for approximately four months.

Supervised visitation between individuals and their children is available and is provided by skilled, trained mental health professionals experienced in the dynamics of abuse. These supervisors can provide feedback and immediate intervention with respect to inappropriate interactions, both blatant and subtle, rather than simply offering a physical presence during the visitation sessions. Thorough written reports examining the interactional dynamics of the visitation participants and recommendations for therapeutic intervention and focus are also provided. Visitation sessions can be videotaped when requested or deemed necessary.

Cases involving alleged or adjudicated sexual abuse perpetration, physical abuse, neglect, or emotional abuse are all appropriate referrals. Visits usually last for approximately one hour. Once visits are established and are proceeding well according to the supervisor’s assessment, visits may be held outside the office setting, with court or social service approval, at the supervisor’s discretion. Multi-hour visits of two hours or more can also be arranged.

All treatment at Emergence begins with an intake, otherwise known as a diagnostic assessment.  This assessment is where we begin the treatment process and start developing treatment goals in collaboration with the client. The client’s needs are assessed, and plan of action is developed based on the information gathered.

A diagnostic assessment consists of an interview with the client and culminates in a report documenting the client’s functioning and needs. The report includes the client’s current mental health status, history, the nature and severity of mental illness/behavioral difficulties, functional impairment, strengths, and resources.

A diagnostic assessment is necessary to determine a client’s need and eligibility for services. From this assessment we determine program placement.

While assessing and treating sexual behavior is not an exact science, it is necessary to provide services which are as comprehensive and competent as possible. Psychophysiological assessment can assist with assessing treatment progress and to refine treatment objectives.  These assessment assist with identifying an individual’s arousal patterns and can help counter denial in treatment. Information gathered in these assessments helps with the development of plans to prevent sexual harm.

The LOOK assessment and PPGs, can be administered to AEBH clients or for outside providers who do not have access to this equipment for their own clients.

Referral & Intake Procedure

Referrals can be made by the courts, probation, social service agencies, health care management organizations, attorneys, employers, families, and clients themselves. Our services range from programming designed for low-risk individuals that meet as little as once a month to higher risk individuals who attend services multiple times a week to residential services where the client resides at our facility and receives intensive treatment in a 24 hour a day 7 day a week supervised environment.

Our intake process begins with a diagnostic assessment where we determine which services are most appropriate for the client. In some cases, it may be decided during the assessment process that a referral to another agency is most appropriate. An appointment for a diagnostic assessment does not mean treatment admission is guaranteed, the assessment is used to determine appropriateness for treatment at AEBH. 

Scheduling intake is done by calling our main number is 763-333-8001 or emailing info@alphaemergence.org. In some cases, referral sources may wish to fax a referral or collateral documentation, our fax number is 651-925-0267.

Once an intake appointment is scheduled our team will contact involved individuals and agencies to gather necessary information. The admin team will send intake paperwork for signatures to the client and will get insurance information if applicable as well. 

Additional Information on Programming

Further information about AEBH’s programs can be obtained by contacting the Clinical Director, Brenda Frye, at (612) 872-8218. Inquiries may also be sent to Alpha Emergence Behavioral Health, 2712 Fremont Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55408-1198 or by e-mail to info@alphaemergence.org.